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II. A GAME OF CHESS

1 Leave a comment on paragraph 1 0 The Chair she sat in, like a burnished throne,

2 Leave a comment on paragraph 2 0 Glowed on the marble, where the glass

3 Leave a comment on paragraph 3 0 Held up by standards wrought with fruited vines

4 Leave a comment on paragraph 4 0 From which a golden Cupidon peeped out      80

5 Leave a comment on paragraph 5 0 (Another hid his eyes behind his wing)

6 Leave a comment on paragraph 6 0 Doubled the flames of sevenbranched candelabra

7 Leave a comment on paragraph 7 0 Reflecting light upon the table as

8 Leave a comment on paragraph 8 0 The glitter of her jewels rose to meet it,

9 Leave a comment on paragraph 9 0 From satin cases poured in rich profusion;

10 Leave a comment on paragraph 10 0 In vials of ivory and coloured glass

11 Leave a comment on paragraph 11 0 Unstoppered, lurked her strange synthetic perfumes,

12 Leave a comment on paragraph 12 0 Unguent, powdered, or liquid – troubled, confused

13 Leave a comment on paragraph 13 0 And drowned the sense in odours; stirred by the air

14 Leave a comment on paragraph 14 0 That freshened from the window, these ascended    90

15 Leave a comment on paragraph 15 0 In fattening the prolonged candle-flames,

16 Leave a comment on paragraph 16 0 Flung their smoke into the laquearia,

17 Leave a comment on paragraph 17 0 Stirring the pattern on the coffered ceiling.

18 Leave a comment on paragraph 18 0 Huge sea-wood fed with copper

19 Leave a comment on paragraph 19 0 Burned green and orange, framed by the coloured stone,

20 Leave a comment on paragraph 20 0 In which sad light a carved dolphin swam.

21 Leave a comment on paragraph 21 0 Above the antique mantel was displayed

22 Leave a comment on paragraph 22 0 As though a window gave upon the sylvan scene

23 Leave a comment on paragraph 23 0 The change of Philomel, by the barbarous king

24 Leave a comment on paragraph 24 0 So rudely forced; yet there the nightingale      100

25 Leave a comment on paragraph 25 0 Filled all the desert with inviolable voice

26 Leave a comment on paragraph 26 0 And still she cried, and still the world pursues,

27 Leave a comment on paragraph 27 0 “Jug Jug” to dirty ears.

28 Leave a comment on paragraph 28 0 And other withered stumps of time

29 Leave a comment on paragraph 29 0 Were told upon the walls; staring forms

30 Leave a comment on paragraph 30 0 Leaned out, leaning, hushing the room enclosed.

31 Leave a comment on paragraph 31 0 Footsteps shuffled on the stair.

32 Leave a comment on paragraph 32 0 Under the firelight, under the brush, her hair

33 Leave a comment on paragraph 33 0 Spread out in fiery points

34 Leave a comment on paragraph 34 0 Glowed into words, then would be savagely still.      110

35 Leave a comment on paragraph 35 0  

36 Leave a comment on paragraph 36 0 “My nerves are bad to-night. Yes, bad. Stay with me.

37 Leave a comment on paragraph 37 0 “Speak to me. Why do you never speak. Speak.

38 Leave a comment on paragraph 38 0 “What are you thinking of? What thinking? What?

39 Leave a comment on paragraph 39 0 “I never know what you are thinking. Think.”

40 Leave a comment on paragraph 40 0  

41 Leave a comment on paragraph 41 0 I think we are in rats’ alley

42 Leave a comment on paragraph 42 0 Where the dead men lost their bones.

43 Leave a comment on paragraph 43 0  

44 Leave a comment on paragraph 44 0 “What is that noise?”

45 Leave a comment on paragraph 45 0 The wind under the door.

46 Leave a comment on paragraph 46 0 “What is that noise now? What is the wind doing?”

47 Leave a comment on paragraph 47 0 Nothing again nothing.       120

48 Leave a comment on paragraph 48 0 “Do

49 Leave a comment on paragraph 49 0 “You know nothing? Do you see nothing? Do you remember

50 Leave a comment on paragraph 50 0 “Nothing?”

51 Leave a comment on paragraph 51 0  

52 Leave a comment on paragraph 52 0 I remember

53 Leave a comment on paragraph 53 0 Those are pearls that were his eyes.

54 Leave a comment on paragraph 54 0 “Are you alive, or not? Is there nothing in your head?”

55 Leave a comment on paragraph 55 0 But

56 Leave a comment on paragraph 56 0 O O O O that Shakespeherian Rag –

57 Leave a comment on paragraph 57 0 It’s so elegant

58 Leave a comment on paragraph 58 0 So intelligent      130

59 Leave a comment on paragraph 59 0 “What shall I do now? What shall I do?”

60 Leave a comment on paragraph 60 0 I shall rush out as I am, and walk the street

61 Leave a comment on paragraph 61 0 “With my hair down, so. What shall we do to-morrow?

62 Leave a comment on paragraph 62 0 “What shall we ever do?”

63 Leave a comment on paragraph 63 0 The hot water at ten.

64 Leave a comment on paragraph 64 0 And if it rains, a closed car at four.

65 Leave a comment on paragraph 65 0 And we shall play a game of chess,

66 Leave a comment on paragraph 66 0 Pressing lidless eyes and waiting for a knock upon the door.

67 Leave a comment on paragraph 67 0  

68 Leave a comment on paragraph 68 0 When Lil’s husband got demobbed, I said –

69 Leave a comment on paragraph 69 0 I didn’t mince my words, I said to her myself,      140

70 Leave a comment on paragraph 70 0 HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME

71 Leave a comment on paragraph 71 0 Now Albert’s coming back, make yourself a bit smart.

72 Leave a comment on paragraph 72 0 He’ll want to know what you done with that money he gave you

73 Leave a comment on paragraph 73 0 To get yourself some teeth. He did, I was there.

74 Leave a comment on paragraph 74 0 You have them all out, Lil, and get a nice set,

75 Leave a comment on paragraph 75 0 He said, I swear, I can’t bear to look at you.

76 Leave a comment on paragraph 76 0 And no more can’t I, I said, and think of poor Albert,

77 Leave a comment on paragraph 77 0 He’s been in the army four years, he wants a good time,

78 Leave a comment on paragraph 78 0 And if you don’t give it him, there’s others will, I said.

79 Leave a comment on paragraph 79 0 Oh is there, she said. Something o’ that, I said.      150

80 Leave a comment on paragraph 80 0 Then I’ll know who to thank, she said, and give me a straight look.

81 Leave a comment on paragraph 81 0 HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME

82 Leave a comment on paragraph 82 0 If you don’t like it you can get on with it, I said.

83 Leave a comment on paragraph 83 0 Others can pick and choose if you can’t.

84 Leave a comment on paragraph 84 0 But if Albert makes off, it won’t be for lack of telling.

85 Leave a comment on paragraph 85 0 You ought to be ashamed, I said, to look so antique.

86 Leave a comment on paragraph 86 0 (And her only thirty-one.)

87 Leave a comment on paragraph 87 0 I can’t help it, she said, pulling a long face,

88 Leave a comment on paragraph 88 0 It’s them pills I took, to bring it off, she said.

89 Leave a comment on paragraph 89 0 (She’s had five already, and nearly died of young George.)      160

90 Leave a comment on paragraph 90 0 The chemist said it would be alright, but I’ve never been the same.

91 Leave a comment on paragraph 91 0 You are a proper fool, I said.

92 Leave a comment on paragraph 92 0 Well, if Albert won’t leave you alone, there it is, I said,

93 Leave a comment on paragraph 93 0 What you get married for if you don’t want children?

94 Leave a comment on paragraph 94 0 HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME

95 Leave a comment on paragraph 95 0 Well, that Sunday Albert was home, they had a hot gammon,

96 Leave a comment on paragraph 96 0 And they asked me in to dinner, to get the beauty of it hot –

97 Leave a comment on paragraph 97 0 HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME

98 Leave a comment on paragraph 98 0 HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME

99 Leave a comment on paragraph 99 0 Goonight Bill. Goonight Lou. Goonight May. Goonight.      170

100 Leave a comment on paragraph 100 0 Ta ta. Goonight. Goonight.

101 Leave a comment on paragraph 101 0 Good night, ladies, good night, sweet ladies, good night, good night.

Source: http://jallred.net/wordpress/wastelandreception/2012/09/12/ii-a-game-of-chess-2/