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III. THE FIRE SERMON

1 Leave a comment on paragraph 1 0 III. THE FIRE SERMON

2 Leave a comment on paragraph 2 0  

3 Leave a comment on paragraph 3 0 The river’s tent is broken: the last fingers of leaf

4 Leave a comment on paragraph 4 0 Clutch and sink into the wet bank. The wind

5 Leave a comment on paragraph 5 0 Crosses the brown land, unheard. The nymphs are departed.

6 Leave a comment on paragraph 6 0 Sweet Thames, run softly, till I end my song.

7 Leave a comment on paragraph 7 0 The river bears no empty bottles, sandwich papers,

8 Leave a comment on paragraph 8 0 Silk handkerchiefs, cardboard boxes, cigarette ends

9 Leave a comment on paragraph 9 0 Or other testimony of summer nights. The nymphs are departed.

10 Leave a comment on paragraph 10 0 And their friends, the loitering heirs of city directors;    180

11 Leave a comment on paragraph 11 0 Departed, have left no addresses.

12 Leave a comment on paragraph 12 0  

13 Leave a comment on paragraph 13 0 By the waters of Leman I sat down and wept . . .

14 Leave a comment on paragraph 14 0 Sweet Thames, run softly till I end my song,

15 Leave a comment on paragraph 15 0 Sweet Thames, run softly, for I speak not loud or long.

16 Leave a comment on paragraph 16 0 But at my back in a cold blast I hear

17 Leave a comment on paragraph 17 0 The rattle of the bones, and chuckle spread from ear to ear.

18 Leave a comment on paragraph 18 0 A rat crept softly through the vegetation

19 Leave a comment on paragraph 19 0 Dragging its slimy belly on the bank

20 Leave a comment on paragraph 20 0 While I was fishing in the dull canal

21 Leave a comment on paragraph 21 0 On a winter evening round behind the gashouse       190

22 Leave a comment on paragraph 22 0 Musing upon the king my brother’s wreck

23 Leave a comment on paragraph 23 0 And on the king my father’s death before him.

24 Leave a comment on paragraph 24 0 White bodies naked on the low damp ground

25 Leave a comment on paragraph 25 0 And bones cast in a little low dry garret,

26 Leave a comment on paragraph 26 0 Rattled by the rat’s foot only, year to year.

27 Leave a comment on paragraph 27 0 But at my back from time to time I hear

28 Leave a comment on paragraph 28 0 The sound of horns and motors, which shall bring

29 Leave a comment on paragraph 29 0 Sweeney to Mrs. Porter in the spring.

30 Leave a comment on paragraph 30 0 O the moon shone bright on Mrs. Porter

31 Leave a comment on paragraph 31 0 And on her daughter      200

32 Leave a comment on paragraph 32 0 They wash their feet in soda water

33 Leave a comment on paragraph 33 0 Et O ces voix d’enfants, chantant dans la coupole!

34 Leave a comment on paragraph 34 0  

35 Leave a comment on paragraph 35 0 Twit twit twit

36 Leave a comment on paragraph 36 0 Jug jug jug jug jug jug

37 Leave a comment on paragraph 37 0 So rudely forc’d.

38 Leave a comment on paragraph 38 0 Tereu

39 Leave a comment on paragraph 39 0  

40 Leave a comment on paragraph 40 0 Unreal City

41 Leave a comment on paragraph 41 0 Under the brown fog of a winter noon

42 Leave a comment on paragraph 42 0 Mr. Eugenides, the Smyrna merchant

43 Leave a comment on paragraph 43 0 Unshaven, with a pocket full of currants      210

44 Leave a comment on paragraph 44 0 C.i.f. London: documents at sight,

45 Leave a comment on paragraph 45 0 Asked me in demotic French

46 Leave a comment on paragraph 46 0 To luncheon at the Cannon Street Hotel

47 Leave a comment on paragraph 47 0 Followed by a weekend at the Metropole.

48 Leave a comment on paragraph 48 0  

49 Leave a comment on paragraph 49 0 At the violet hour, when the eyes and back

50 Leave a comment on paragraph 50 0 Turn upward from the desk, when the human engine waits

51 Leave a comment on paragraph 51 0 Like a taxi throbbing waiting,

52 Leave a comment on paragraph 52 0 I Tiresias, though blind, throbbing between two lives,

53 Leave a comment on paragraph 53 0 Old man with wrinkled female breasts, can see

54 Leave a comment on paragraph 54 0 At the violet hour, the evening hour that strives      220

55 Leave a comment on paragraph 55 0 Homeward, and brings the sailor home from sea,

56 Leave a comment on paragraph 56 0 The typist home at teatime, clears her breakfast, lights

57 Leave a comment on paragraph 57 0 Her stove, and lays out food in tins.

58 Leave a comment on paragraph 58 0 Out of the window perilously spread

59 Leave a comment on paragraph 59 0 Her drying combinations touched by the sun’s last rays,

60 Leave a comment on paragraph 60 0 On the divan are piled (at night her bed)

61 Leave a comment on paragraph 61 0 Stockings, slippers, camisoles, and stays.

62 Leave a comment on paragraph 62 0 I Tiresias, old man with wrinkled dugs

63 Leave a comment on paragraph 63 0 Perceived the scene, and foretold the rest –

64 Leave a comment on paragraph 64 0 I too awaited the expected guest.      230

65 Leave a comment on paragraph 65 0 He, the young man carbuncular, arrives,

66 Leave a comment on paragraph 66 0 A small house agent’s clerk, with one bold stare,

67 Leave a comment on paragraph 67 0 One of the low on whom assurance sits

68 Leave a comment on paragraph 68 0 As a silk hat on a Bradford millionaire.

69 Leave a comment on paragraph 69 0 The time is now propitious, as he guesses,

70 Leave a comment on paragraph 70 0 The meal is ended, she is bored and tired,

71 Leave a comment on paragraph 71 0 Endeavours to engage her in caresses

72 Leave a comment on paragraph 72 0 Which still are unreproved, if undesired.

73 Leave a comment on paragraph 73 0 Flushed and decided, he assaults at once;

74 Leave a comment on paragraph 74 0 Exploring hands encounter no defence;      240

75 Leave a comment on paragraph 75 0 His vanity requires no response,

76 Leave a comment on paragraph 76 0 And makes a welcome of indifference.

77 Leave a comment on paragraph 77 0 (And I Tiresias have foresuffered all

78 Leave a comment on paragraph 78 0 Enacted on this same divan or bed;

79 Leave a comment on paragraph 79 0 I who have sat by Thebes below the wall

80 Leave a comment on paragraph 80 0 And walked among the lowest of the dead.)

81 Leave a comment on paragraph 81 0 Bestows one final patronising kiss,

82 Leave a comment on paragraph 82 0 And gropes his way, finding the stairs unlit . . .

83 Leave a comment on paragraph 83 0  

84 Leave a comment on paragraph 84 0 She turns and looks a moment in the glass,

85 Leave a comment on paragraph 85 0 Hardly aware of her departed lover;      250

86 Leave a comment on paragraph 86 0 Her brain allows one half-formed thought to pass:

87 Leave a comment on paragraph 87 0 “Well now that’s done: and I’m glad it’s over.”

88 Leave a comment on paragraph 88 0 When lovely woman stoops to folly and

89 Leave a comment on paragraph 89 0 Paces about her room again, alone,

90 Leave a comment on paragraph 90 0 She smoothes her hair with automatic hand,

91 Leave a comment on paragraph 91 0 And puts a record on the gramophone.

92 Leave a comment on paragraph 92 0  

93 Leave a comment on paragraph 93 0 “This music crept by me upon the waters”

94 Leave a comment on paragraph 94 0 And along the Strand, up Queen Victoria Street.

95 Leave a comment on paragraph 95 0 O City city, I can sometimes hear

96 Leave a comment on paragraph 96 0 Beside a public bar in Lower Thames Street,     260

97 Leave a comment on paragraph 97 0 The pleasant whining of a mandoline

98 Leave a comment on paragraph 98 0 And a clatter and a chatter from within

99 Leave a comment on paragraph 99 0 Where fishmen lounge at noon: where the walls

100 Leave a comment on paragraph 100 0 Of Magnus Martyr hold

101 Leave a comment on paragraph 101 0 Inexplicable splendour of Ionian white and gold.

102 Leave a comment on paragraph 102 0  

103 Leave a comment on paragraph 103 0 The river sweats

104 Leave a comment on paragraph 104 0 Oil and tar

105 Leave a comment on paragraph 105 0 The barges drift

106 Leave a comment on paragraph 106 0 With the turning tide

107 Leave a comment on paragraph 107 0 Red sails     270

108 Leave a comment on paragraph 108 0 Wide

109 Leave a comment on paragraph 109 0 To leeward, swing on the heavy spar.

110 Leave a comment on paragraph 110 0 The barges wash

111 Leave a comment on paragraph 111 0 Drifting logs

112 Leave a comment on paragraph 112 0 Down Greenwich reach

113 Leave a comment on paragraph 113 0 Past the Isle of Dogs.

114 Leave a comment on paragraph 114 0 Weialala leia

115 Leave a comment on paragraph 115 0 Wallala leialala

116 Leave a comment on paragraph 116 0  

117 Leave a comment on paragraph 117 0 Elizabeth and Leicester

118 Leave a comment on paragraph 118 0 Beating oars      280

119 Leave a comment on paragraph 119 0 The stern was formed

120 Leave a comment on paragraph 120 0 A gilded shell

121 Leave a comment on paragraph 121 0 Red and gold

122 Leave a comment on paragraph 122 0 The brisk swell

123 Leave a comment on paragraph 123 0 Rippled both shores

124 Leave a comment on paragraph 124 0 Southwest wind

125 Leave a comment on paragraph 125 0 Carried down stream

126 Leave a comment on paragraph 126 0 The peal of bells

127 Leave a comment on paragraph 127 0 White towers

128 Leave a comment on paragraph 128 0 Weialala leia      290

129 Leave a comment on paragraph 129 0 Wallala leialala

130 Leave a comment on paragraph 130 0  

131 Leave a comment on paragraph 131 0 “Trams and dusty trees.

132 Leave a comment on paragraph 132 0 Highbury bore me. Richmond and Kew

133 Leave a comment on paragraph 133 0 Undid me. By Richmond I raised my knees

134 Leave a comment on paragraph 134 0 Supine on the floor of a narrow canoe.”

135 Leave a comment on paragraph 135 0  

136 Leave a comment on paragraph 136 0 “My feet are at Moorgate, and my heart

137 Leave a comment on paragraph 137 0 Under my feet. After the event

138 Leave a comment on paragraph 138 0 He wept. He promised ‘a new start’.

139 Leave a comment on paragraph 139 0 I made no comment. What should I resent?”

140 Leave a comment on paragraph 140 0 “On Margate Sands.      300

141 Leave a comment on paragraph 141 0 I can connect

142 Leave a comment on paragraph 142 0 Nothing with nothing.

143 Leave a comment on paragraph 143 0 The broken fingernails of dirty hands.

144 Leave a comment on paragraph 144 0 My people humble people who expect

145 Leave a comment on paragraph 145 0 Nothing.”

146 Leave a comment on paragraph 146 0 la la

147 Leave a comment on paragraph 147 0  

148 Leave a comment on paragraph 148 0 To Carthage then I came

149 Leave a comment on paragraph 149 0  

150 Leave a comment on paragraph 150 0 Burning burning burning burning

151 Leave a comment on paragraph 151 0 O Lord Thou pluckest me out

152 Leave a comment on paragraph 152 0 O Lord Thou pluckest    310

153 Leave a comment on paragraph 153 0  

154 Leave a comment on paragraph 154 0 burning

Source: http://jallred.net/wordpress/wastelandreception/2012/09/12/iii-the-fire-sermon-2/